The World Of Khoras - Magic - Arcana - Armor

Elvish Plant Armor

Other Names None
Category Armor
Magical Strength Major

Physical Description

Elvish plant armor appears as tightly woven strands of grass, layers of leaves and plates of bark. Each leaf has a slightly metallic iridescent sheen to it. The leaves and grass blades move freely, but are exceptionally tough and fibrous. Sharp wood thorns grow from the bark plates. The elves of Cyrell manufacture a slightly heavy version of this armor while the elves of Ethara use a lighter, slimmer version which has no bark plates and no thorns.

History

For centuries, the elves have been manufacturing a form of armor composed of living plants. It is highly magical, expensive and difficult to make. It is worn by elven heroes and, on rare occasions, given to friends of the elf people.

Enchantment

Plant armor gives excellent protection while remaining very light and flexible. It is also very quiet. The armor can re-grow damage, in effect repairing itself, entirely in 24 hours if given proper care (water and sunlight). The Cyrellian version of plant armor has sections that are covered in thorns and gives the wearer an advantage in wrestling, grappling or unarmed combat. Once each day, the wearer can cause the armor to go dormant. When this occurs, the boots of the armor root to the ground and the armor rapidly grows a tree about itself. This not only provides total protection but allows the wearer to hide within the “tree”. Elves often use this function to sleep in a completely safe and concealed environment. The “tree” will until the next sun rise.

This armor draws its power from the forest around it. It only functions within a forest environment. Outside of a forest environment, its loses the ability to envelop itself in a tree and also does not regrow damaged parts.

Drellis Effect Response

During a Drellis phase, the armor functions just as it does outside of a forest environment. i.e. it can not go dormant and grow the protective tree. Also, it will not repair itself during a Drellis phase.

This website was last updated November 26, 2017 . Copyright 1990-2017 David M. Roomes.

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