The World Of Khoras - Fauna and Flora - Fauna - Forest

Krallinar

Other Names Great Cat
Climate/Terrain Temperate and sub polar forests
Frequency Rare
Organization Solitary
Activity Cycle

Any

Diet Carnivore

A full grown male krallinar assuming an intimidating pose to scare away intruders.

Physical Description

The ferocious krallinar is a large, fur covered quadruped that greatly resembles a lion. It's golden brown fur is rough and wiry. It's large mouth is filled with teeth. It has two separate eyes in each eye socket which can operate independently. This allows it to focus on multiple targets in all directions. An adult male krallinar is typically 2 meters at the shoulder, 4 meters long and can weigh more than 700 kilograms (1,500 pounds). It has the agility and leaping ability of a cat, but the mass and brute strength of a large bear. In combat, it lashes out with ten inch claws and has been known to take a man's head off with one bite. It has a long, wiry bristling tail which splits into several smaller whip like tails.

Combat

Krallinar seem to have been designed with the best characteristics of both bears and lions. They have the sheer body mass and strength of grizzly bears, but are agile like lions, capable of astounding leaps and bursts of running speed. Some reports suggest the beast can leap 13 meters (40 feet) horizontally with a good running start. Krallinar can climb large trees faster than an elf, but are unable to move out on most branches due to their weight.

Habitat

The krallinar is normally found in thick forests especially in the west, ranging from the Grand Wood to the Shattered Mountains . Krallinar mate for life and the females, who are smaller than the males, bear litters of three to six young.

Ecology

This terror was magically engineered by the Traxxian Legion during the Great War as a steed and battle trained beast. Since that time the krallinar has reverted to the wild. Fortunately, very few of these creatures remain and those that do live far from civilized lands.

A young female krallinar on the prowl.

This website was last updated November 26, 2017 . Copyright 1990-2017 David M. Roomes.

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